What other Viewing Conditions affect colour?

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ISO Standards

There are two ISO standards for setting up monitors and viewing conditions for evaluating images. For commercial photographers and graphic designers who are preparing images for printing on a variety of materials which may not be known at the time of image preparation, ISO 3664 usually applies. For general photographers who are outputting onto photographic paper and wish to get their results to closely match what they see on the screen, we recommend using ISO 12646. The monitor may look very warm, however, if the correct viewing conditions are observed the prints will closely match the calibrated monitor.

monitor.pdf

How to Color Match Your ColorEdge Monitor and Photo Prints

Lighting

Streets Imaging recommend viewing photographs with a standard colour viewing light source available at professional graphic arts suppliers or professional photographic retailers. At the very least Streets Imaging recommend viewing with a compact fluorescent Natural White such as the Nelson BCNS-9W Natural White. Situations where there is a window that allows daylight to enter the room will cause problems as the colour of the daylight will change depending on the time of day and the weather. Incandescent (tungsten) bulbs are too yellow for critical viewing and standard fluorescent tubes have a gap in the red end of the spectrum giving a characteristic green cast to objects lit by them.

Another low voltage lamp for non-critical viewing is the Pro-Lite EXN-P 12V 50W 38deg 4000deg K. 2 or more of these may be required to get sufficient illumination at the print for comparing with the screen.

For those who want consistent, accurate colour matching to a screen, there are numerous light boxes available. A compact unit which takes little room on your desk is the Just Normlicht Just Image Pro 5000 available from DES . GTI units are available from Kayell in Australia.

Doug Raisin

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Street's Imaging Services has been providing professional quality photographic output for professional and amateur photographers since 1975.